Bonnie Cepeda, Aramis Camilo and Kenito Mendes visit Nicolas Maduro and criticism returns

Bonnie Cepeda, Aramis Camilo and Kenito Mendes visit Nicolas Maduro and criticism returns

Dominican Republic Meringeros Boni Cepeda, Aramis Camilo and Quinito Mendes visited Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, where they announced Merengue Festival in Caracas for the month of July.

Thursday’s visit, which was also attended by Venezuelan Meringue player Omar Enrique, sparked controversy because Cepeda sang to Venezuela about Merengue “Santo Domingo”, popularized by singer Mane Cruz, which many have criticized as incorrect.

After listening to the song, Maduro thanked the Dominican Merenguero for giving his country the version titled “In Venezuela”.

“Verily, how beautiful is this song, that gift from Poni Cepeda to Venezuela; Really cool; Maduro said before Meringiros.

Maduro highlighted the Dominican rhythm and asked: “Who doesn’t love meringue?At what party do they play merengue? Who doesn’t dance when they play merengue?

The Venezuelan president said he first learned to dance meringue in salsa, and now “I dance well.”

Then he wrote on Twitter: What a surprise! Bonnie Cepeda gave us the song “En Venezuela”. Nice gift for our people. I’m sure it will cross the line. I receive your love and I repeat: the gates of Venezuela are always open to anyone who wants to come and cheer hearts.”

Maduro also announced a salsa festival on June 7, 8 and 9 and a merengue festival a month later, in July, in Poledro de Caracas.

Last May, the merengue player and the current Dominican Vice Minister of Culture sang to Maduro, which sparked controversy as many consider that as a representative of the Dominican government he should not engage in such government activities in the South American country due to alleged violations. Human rights and the obvious social and economic crisis for the people.

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Cepeda then said he does not regret singing on several occasions to the President of Venezuela, claiming that Artists are free to sing in any country without being bound by political pressures.

The Merenguero received $60,000 from the Bolivarian government on one of his visits, a figure he did not regret receiving because he simply went to work without political purposes, only a technician.

Meringuero commented at the time: “We artists work outside the referees, I sang for Noriega, I sang in Cuba and I think I’m going to sing for Escobar.”

Muhammad Bourn

"Travel expert. Hobbyist web enthusiast. Incurable pop culture nerd."

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