Democrats begin active Senate debate on electoral reform | International

Democrats begin active Senate debate on electoral reform |  International
Demonstration in front of the Senate demanding recognition of electoral reform.Leah Millis (Reuters)

In desperation, Democrat senators in the US Congress are launching an eternal debate on electoral reform, amid growing criticism from civil rights groups and an impasse barrier within two members of the party. This is the fifth time the Senate has sought to ratify the rules on voting rights during this congress, which began with Joe Biden’s visit to the White House almost a year ago.

The efforts of the majority leader of the Upper House, Chuck Schumer, do not care in the slightest when it comes to juggling to avoid the stench of imposed iron. A three-fifths majority To pass a standard. There are two members within the Democrats, though those who are descendants of Martin Luther King, Schumer, or the president of the nation, call for the preservation of democracy and the protection of minorities by electoral law. Any attempt at a simple majority vote.

Guaranteed failure of electoral reform Kirsten Cinema and Joe Mancin. Two Major drawbacks It hurt more than the strong Republican opposition that not even one in 50 senators would move a muscle to defend a law. The logical consequence of the adoption of 34 laws governing voting by 19 states with a Republican majority in 2021 is undoubtedly the above.

Martin Luther King III, the son of a civil rights leader of the same name, represented cinema and Munchin, the white moderates his father preached in his sermons in the 1950s and 1960s, who defined and voted in favor of blacks. But then they could not take action on the request.

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“History does not love them,” he said of the descendants of the pastor killed in Memphis in 1968 in Cinema and Manzin. However, the cinema celebrated Martin Luther King Day, which was celebrated in the United States last Monday, through its Twitter account. “Today we are reminded of the life and traditions of Dr. Martin Luther King,” he said. Strictly speaking, the Arizona senator has nothing to oppose the voting law. Opposition to cinema is to ignore, change or negotiate parliamentary tactics. Cinema wants the laws to be approved by 60 votes.

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He and Munch want at least 10 Republican senators to join the bill and adopt bipartisan character. They also warn that if a deserving majority is high now, Republicans will not be prevented from doing the same when they are in power, which could happen in the by-elections next November. Pitney, who has spent 36 years in the Senate, has been a staunch supporter of the Philippines. Until now. The president announced in a keynote address in Atlanta last week that this was a decisive moment A milestone for American democracy in crisis.

This controversial bill will extend access to the referendum in a country that has seen a decline in the rights of minorities after the passage of Donald Trump at the White House. The reform would restore key provisions of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the law was made possible in 1965 by the mobilization of Luther King and then-President Lyndon Johnson. The House of Representatives passed the bill only last week with the approval of the Democrats and is now facing it. Big and almost impossible – the challenge of passing it in the Senate.

It is assumed that Republicans on Wednesday or Thursday will block the passage of the law, arguing that the restriction responds to the discriminatory interests of the regulator over elections.

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Arzu Daniel

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