Rise of the Corona virus US – US political life Donald Trump goes to Arizona American News

Claudia Lawyer reports to the Associated Press Police unions across the country have largely backed Trump’s re-election, Amid mass protests over police brutality and formal racist allegations. Many black law enforcement officials speak out against these approvals, saying their concerns about entering the political arena by 2020 have been ignored.

Trump has said he has the support of the law enforcement community, which includes some unions that have publicly approved a political candidate for the first time. He drives what he calls a “law and order” platform and taps into the anger and frustration felt by law enforcement who believe they are being unfairly accused of racial discrimination.

The number of minority officers in the police force has more than doubled in the last three decades, but many departments still have a small percentage of black and Hispanic officers compared to the percentage of the general population that those communities make up.

Many fraternal black police organizations were created to support equality within police departments, but focus on how law enforcement affects the wider black community. Tensions are often high between minority organizations and large unions, and in August the National Black Law Enforcement Officers Association issued a letter condemning the deadly force, police misconduct and abuse in color communities.

While support for Republican rule does not necessarily come in racist ways, many black officials say approvals for Trump do not fairly represent all members who are in arrears.

“We are members of these unions. They will not consider our feelings about Donald J. Trump, and then they will not care about us … they will not care about our outstanding amount,” he said. Rochelle Bilal, The latest leader of the Guardian Civic League in Philadelphia, called the national fraternal order endorsed by Trump a “fury.”

READ  Latest news from around the world

Philadelphia Sheriff Rochelle Bilal spoke to reporters at a news conference Friday, condemning the fraternal police and 22 local men for not listening to union members' concerns when approving Trump for re-election.

Philadelphia Sheriff Rochelle Bilal spoke to reporters at a news conference Friday, condemning the fraternal police and 22 local men for not listening to union members’ concerns when approving Trump for re-election. Photo: Michael Perez / A.P.

Bilal, who was elected Philadelphia’s first black woman sheriff last year, spoke at a news conference Friday with other black law enforcement agencies in Philadelphia condemning Trump’s endorsements, and said the process racist comments, support white supremacist groups, and disrespect for women from Trump.

But national union leaders say the process is designed to give everyone a voice, and the approval reflects a majority of officials. The Brotherhood Regulation represents 350,000 officers nationally, but does not monitor ethnic statistics.

“I’m a black American and a black law enforcement officer,” he said Rob Bright, National Brotherhood Order Police Trustees. “It’s been a roller coaster ride for me since the George Floyd incident. It’s scary.”

Pride, who oversees the organisation’s presidential vote, says Floyd was killed in Minneapolis on May 25 and that the political climate “cuts the United States” and has a similar effect on the FOP.

“We may have an hour-long conversation about why some people feel that President Trump is racist and why others disagree,” he said. “But there are a lot of officials of all races from all backgrounds who he considers to better represent and support the interests of law enforcement.”

Written By
More from Arzu Daniel

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *