Treasure hunters roam a small Dutch town looking for clues to jewelry stolen by the Nazis

Map detail showing where Nazi loot is supposedly buried in Ommeren, near Arnhem, Netherlands (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Hand drawn map with The letter X is red which supposedly shows where the file is located Cache of jewelry stolen by the Nazis From a secure bank vault has sparked a modern-day treasure hunt in a A small Dutch village More than three quarters of a century later.

Armed with metal detectors, shovels and copies of the map on their cell phones, the treasure hunters have invaded Omrin – Town 715, 80 kilometers southeast of Amsterdam – in search of WWII treasure based on the diagram published on January 3rd.

“Yes, of course, it’s great news that enchanted the whole village,” said resident Marco Roedfeldt. “But not only from our village, but also from people who are not from here.”

I saved this “All kinds of people were spontaneously digging in the places where they thought the treasure was buried, With a metal detector.

The map with a red cross, housed in the Dutch National Archives in The Hague, sparked a treasure hunt in a small Dutch town (REUTERS / Piroschka van de Wouw)
The map with a red cross, housed in the Dutch National Archives in The Hague, sparked a treasure hunt in a small Dutch town (REUTERS / Piroschka van de Wouw)

It was not clear at first whether the authorities would be able to claim the loot if they found it, or if it could be kept by its discoverer.

To date, there have been no reports of results. Research began this year, when National Archives It issued its annual publication of documents for the study of historians.

Most of them did not attract attention. But the map, which includes a stretch of country road and a red X at the foot of one of the three trees, has unexpectedly spread far and wide to disturb the peace of winter in Omryn.

FILE PHOTO: A sheep in the village of Ommeren, the Netherlands (Reuters/Peruschka van de Wooo)
FILE PHOTO: A sheep in the village of Ommeren, the Netherlands (Reuters/Peruschka van de Wooo)

“The history itself struck us with astonishment. But also the interest it generated,” said Annette Wilkins, a researcher at the National Archives, carefully displaying the map.

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Pictures posted on social media in early January showed People dig wells more than a meter deep, sometimes on private propertyhoping to find a fortune.

(By Alexander Fortola – AP)

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