On June 10, the Moon gets caught in the midst, causing a solar eclipse

On June 10, the Moon gets caught in the midst, causing a solar eclipse

KALAMAZOO, Mich. (WXYZ) – Monkey in the center is well-known, but what about Moon in the center? On early Thursday, June 10, 2021, it will be precisely where it is – between the Earth and the Sun.

“This Solar eclipse will receive a lot of attention because it’s dubbed a ring eclipse, but we’re not going to view it that way in Kalamazoo,” said Mark Reed, Planetarium Manager Kalamazoo Valley Museum. “You’d be nearer towards the Hudson Bay in Canada to see it.”

On the morning of June 10, 2021, as the Moon conceals the Sun, it will throw its shadow on Earth. This will be viewed as a ‘ring of fire’ in northern Canada, while it will be considered in a ravenous PAC-MAN in southern Canada.

“The sun will just be rising in Michigan, and the eclipse will be over in a flash,” Reed added. “We’re not far enough norths, nor are we on the whole path. So, though we’ll see roughly 80% of the Sun obscured, we won’t be able to view the ring ‘option.”

An annular sunlight-based shroud will happen on June 10, 2021, when the Moon will pass among Earth and the Sun, in this manner incompletely darkening the picture of the Sun for a watcher on Earth. During the shroud, the Moon’s clear distance across will be more modest than the Sun’s, so it will obstruct a large portion of the Sun’s light and cause the Sun to seem like an annulus (ring). 

 

The annular obscuration will be apparent from parts of northeastern Canada, Greenland, the Arctic Ocean (disregarding the North Pole[1]), and the Russian Far East, while the shroud will seem incomplete from an area a large number of kilometers wide, which incorporates northern and eastern North America, the vast majority of Europe. Also, north Asia.

On Thursday, June 10, 2021, the Sun rises at 6:05 a.m. in Kalamazoo. Only a few minutes later, the eclipse reaches its peak. Then, at 6:38 a.m., the heavenly curtain closes.

On Thursday, June 10, 2021, the Sun rises at 6:05 a.m. in Kalamazoo. Only a few minutes later, the eclipse reaches its peak. Then, at 6:38 a.m., the heavenly curtain closes.

Register for the Kalamazoo Valley Museum Planetarium’s “Celestial Wonders” to learn more about the solar eclipse in June. The virtual presentation will begin at 2:00 p.m. The date is Wednesday, May 26, 2021.

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Aygen Marsh

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